CLH and Mosaic working together

Newly privatised oil and pipeline network, requiring that Mosaic on-line reach!

In March 2015, the government announced it had agreed to sell the GPSS (Government Pipeline Storage System) to Compañía Logística de Hidrocarburos
(CLH) for £82m, with CLH taking over operation of the GPSS on 30 April 2015. A contractual agreement between the MoD and CLH ensured military fuel requirements continued to be met using the GPSS.

The efficient operation and maintenance of the Government’s Pipeline and Storage System is crucial to the national interest due to its strong links to the military

Government Pipeline and Storage System pre-privatisation

and economy of the country. The network carries around 40 percent of Britain’s aviation fuel around the country, supplying sites such as Heathrow and Gatwick airports, as well as British and U.S military airbases in England and Scotland.

CLH has already review existing working practices and a schedule of programmed works to ensure that this longstanding and vital UK asset is transformed from a military necessity of the war years into a commercial proposition excelling in efficiency, safety and reliability.

They chose the Mosaic system to help them improve working practices and the health & safety record across this vast network. They virtually use all elements of the Mosaic system from the competency platform with SkillCheck at its core. This is utilised in tandem with the Mosaic Occupational Health module and the Mosaic Induction Manager. Due to the high number of safety critical roles evident across the network, Mosaic Briefing Manager, most notably during Toolbox talks, is used to great effect. Having a robust ‘Competency Management System’ that has bolt-ons, such as Mosaic Briefing Manager, and is delivered on-line is proving a success in this newly privatised operation.

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Competency management system in use at Hinkley Point C

Mosaic helps Costain deliver on marine tunnelling project at Hinkley Point C

Costain, one of the UK’s leading engineering solutions providers, is delighted be a major contract partner in the construction of the new Hinkley Point C nuclear power station in Somerset. Costain has started work and will provide the design and delivery of the water cooling systems for the nuclear power station.

Costain will design and construct three marine tunnels, around 11km in total length and each one approximately seven metres in diameter, to take in cooling water from the Severn Estuary for the nuclear reactor before it is cleansed, recycled and returned. They will also be building a jetty at the site.

Mosaic Management Systems will provide an on-line competency management system to support site management on this project. A 500+ strong workforce will be deployed on this phase of the project. Mosaic has been working with Costain now for a number of years, which means data can be migrated across from previous projects that Mosaic has been deployed on. The unique ability of the Mosaic system is that it has a ‘Network Passport’ allowing relevant work details to be transferred across, thus saving considerable time during set up of a new project.

John Micciche MD of Mosaic said “We have worked with Costain on numerous projects now and we are extremely pleased that they have chosen us once again, particularly on such a ground-breaking project.”

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Thames Tideway Tunnel - Blackfriars barge launches super sewer construction

Work on Thames Tideway Tunnel commences with Mosaic’s Competency Management System at its core

After years of planning, construction work for the new 25 kilometre interception, storage and transfer tunnel running up to 65 metres below the river, known as the Thames Tideway Tunnel, started at the back end of 2016. Beginning in west London, the main tunnel generally follows the route of the River Thames to Limehouse, where it then continues north-east to Abbey Mills Pumping Station near Stratford. There it will be connected to the Lee Tunnel, which will transfer the sewage to Beckton Sewage Treatment Works. Overflows of untreated sewage into the tidal River Thames add up to tens of millions of tonnes every year. This is unacceptable and the Thames Tideway Tunnel will finally clean up the capital’s river after years of polution.

Thames Tideway Tunnel - the solution in brief

A joint venture between Laing O’Rourke and Ferrovial Agroman has landed the largest Central section drive worth £600m-£900m. The Eastern section of the tunnel has been bagged by a Costain, Vinci and Bachy joint venture and is expected to cost £500m-£800m. Another three-way consortium consisting of Balfour Beatty, BAM Nuttall and Morgan Sindall has picked up the shorter western tunnel drive, which is expected to be worth somewhere between £300m-£500m.

Cross-section of Thames Tideway Tunnel plans
Cross-section of Thames Tideway Tunnel plans

The tunnels will be dug with a gently sloping gradient, falling 1m for every 790m it travels at a depth up to 60m below the

Tunnel Boring Machine at Lee Tunnel - Thames Tideway Project
Tunnel Boring Machine at Lee Tunnel – Thames Tideway Project

surface. Under the present programme, construction is expected to start in 2016 and conclude in 2023. The total Thames Tideway Project is estimated to cost around £4.2bn at 2011 prices. Around £1.4bn of the Thames Tideway Tunnel’s construction cost will be financed by Thames Water and £2.8bn by Thames Tideway Tunnel Ltd.

Mosaic Management Systems is delighted to be involved with such a prestigious engineering project and will be providing a universal system covering all three sections of the build. Certain parts of our system are already in use inducting / onboarding workers and assigning them to the correct job role via our SkillCheck application.  Toolbox talks are being issued and recorded on PDA’s (Personal Digital Assistant) while evidence, such as qualification and CSCS cards, relating to workers is being up loaded via our new Evidence Manager addition.

John Micciche MD of the company commented “We have been working in the Water Sector for a while now and have accumulated a lot of experience in this industry, but it is always great to be involved in such a high profile project”.

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Crossrail's bond street redevelopment

Mosaic ‘Competency Management System’ involved in Crossrail’s delivery of Bond Street station

A joint venture between Costain and Skanska to build Crossrail’s Bond Street station is up and running. This is the last of the main construction contracts for the new line’s central section stations.

Bond Street Crossrail station will be directly connected to the neighbouring Tube station allowing passengers to interchange between Crossrail and London Underground services. When completed the £300million redevelopment will transform the station delivering:

  • A dramatic increase in station capacity ahead of the completion of Crossrail;
  • A new entrance and ticket hall north of Oxford Street to increase capacity and provide step-free access to both the Central and Jubilee lines;
  • New escalators and an additional access route to the Jubilee line to reduce congestion; An improved interchange between Central and Jubilee lines;
  • Step-free access to the new Crossrail station;
  • and Improved pedestrian areas around the station with new seating and lighting;

More than 155,000 passengers currently use Bond Street Tube station every day, a figure that’s expected to rise to over 225,000 with the arrival of Crossrail in 2017.

The Mosaic competency management system has been chosen on this JV project to provide an on-line ‘Network Passport’ platform to deliver Project Inductions and SkillCheck. The project lead also proposes to use the Mosaic Occupational Health module and Mosaic Briefing Manager. Recording of toolbox talks is seen by the management team as a crucial means of delivering and reinforcing safety messages across the site.

Advancing safety with mobile technology

Advancing safety with mobile technology

Mobile technology plays a vital role in the management of assets and employees in most businesses today, whether it’s a colleague sending updates to a manager about their whereabouts, or the ability to access company servers and information remotely. For businesses with a workforce based on multiple sites, such as construction firms, quantity surveyors, engineers and project managers, there is even more to gain – mobile solutions can not only help drive efficiencies and achieve long-term productivity gains, but can also provide additional protection for workers.  The latest rugged devices can withstand the elements that field workers are subject to, and offer additional call functionality in the event of emergencies.

A mobile duty of care

According to data from the UK’s Health and Safety Executive (HSE), each year in the construction sector, around three percent of workers sustain a work-related injury, with an estimated 66,000 self-reported injuries. Worryingly in 2015/16, there were 43 fatal injuries to construction industry workers, a rate of 1.94 per 100,000. The health and safety of lone workers is a major concern for construction firms. Could the implementation of new mobile technology help prevent further fatal injuries? Perhaps not, but it will help to give managers the peace of mind that they have taken steps to avoid or control risks where necessary.

advancing mobile usage in the construction sector

While prevention is the ultimate goal, there must also be tools in place to provide rapid help when accidents occur. This means providing a means of consistent, reliable communication with management, team members and emergency services.  This equipment should include specialised mobile devices featuring a pre-installed Lone Worker Protection App, which can be easily accessed at the touch of a button. This offers an audible and text alarm, sending a worker’s GPS location and alert message to their manager or colleague. For lone workers in more hazardous working conditions, an app like this will allow an accelerometer to be set, triggering an alarm if the user suffers a fall. With these features, businesses can be sure their workers will receive emergency care quickly when needed.

Constant connectivity

Ensuring worker safety means choosing a mobile solution which offers both the connectivity of a high-end smartphone, and the additional functionality of a specialised device. For example, dual SIM card functionality allows for multiple network connections, reducing the potential for workers experiencing mobile black spots. These communication precautions can also prove invaluable when it comes to boosting business efficiency. For example, a ‘push to talk’ button will allow a manager to instantly communicate one-to-one or one-to-many, providing cohesion among workers based in separate locations.

Tough on the outside

Anyone with a smartphone will know how fragile these devices can be – dropping a device from even hand-height can easily result in a cracked screen. Frustrating for the everyday phone owner; a potential health and safety hazaAdvancing safety with mobile technologyrd if you’re a lone worker on a remote site. One of the biggest challenges is the lack of mobile devices on the market which are both powerful and rugged enough to withstand harsh environments. Only a fraction of mobile devices offer an IP68 rating (meaning the handset is protected against complete dust ingress and can withstand continuous immersion in water beyond 1m), or robust build quality that conform to MIL-STD 810G. However, most of these devices do not offer the additional functionality of a specialised handset – one which is rugged, powerful and supports functions like Lone Worker Protection and dual SIM – which would allow managers and business owners to comply with regulations, and could help reduce those HSE figures in the years to come.

Smart competition

Construction remains a high-risk industry, and accidents are not uncommon. According to HSE’s figures, the combination of work-related illness and workplace injuries in the sector leads to 2.2 million working days lost annually. This will significantly impact a company’s bottom line, and indicates that not enough is being done to ensure worker safety.

Improvements in mobile technology mean that devices are now available which incorporate the functionality of a high-end smartphone with specialised features and a ruggedised exterior. Mobile technology of course plays a central role in improving business efficiency in other areas too, with smartphones providing features like real-time information and asset sharing, as well as other workforce management tools. In order to maximise the benefits offered by mobile, while simultaneously verifying the safety of a workforce, the construction industry needs to adopt specialised rugged mobile devices which are tough on the outside, and smart on the inside.

Ultimately, the safety of a workforce should be a top priority for any manager today, regardless of the industry. In high risk sectors, this is more important still. A manager is liable for their workforce’s safety, and the financial and moral implications of not complying regulations are simply too high.

Source: Stephen Westley, Dewalt – Advancing safety with mobile technology – SHP Online

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HSE statistics - Work related ill health in the construction industry has returned to rates last seen in 2008–09 following an increase of around 9% in 2015/16, according to the latest annual statistics from the HSE.

Work related ill health in the construction industry is on the rise

Work related ill health in the construction industry has returned to rates last seen in 2008–09 following an increase of around 9% in 2015/16, according to the latest annual statistics from the HSE.

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Across all industries, the proportion of the workforce suffering with an illness caused or made worse by work also increased slightly, helping to swell the number of working days lost to ill health from 23.3m in 2014–15 to 26m last year.

The number of people in the building sector reporting that they had developed an illness caused or made worse by work in the last year went up from 76,000 in 2014–15 to 84,000 in 2015–16.

Following a decline in the rate of self-reported illness between 2006–07 and 2011–12, the proportion of the construction workforce suffering an illness has increased each year since.

The HSE figures show that the rate in 2015–16 stands at 3730 per 100,000 – around 3.7% of the workforce – compared to 3410 in the year before. In 2011–12, it was 2570.

Out of the 84,000 construction workers  who said they had an illness in 2015–16, two-thirds (56,000) said they had a musculoskeletal disorder.

However, fewer construction industry workers were injured last year, according to reports made under RIDDOR. The rate of injuries requiring seven or more days’ absence fell from 279 per 100,000 workers in 2014–15 to 259 in 2015–2016.

Specified injuries – the most serious – also declined slightly, from 143 to 139 per 100,000.

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The rate of illness across all industries in 2015–16 was 4050 per 100,000 workers, a five year high.

Musculoskeletal disorders were the most common forms of illness, accounting for 41% of the total, followed by stress, depression or anxiety, which made up 37% of all illnesses.

The total amount of time that illness forced workers across all sectors of the economy to take off sick also increased last year to its highest since 2007–08. There were nearly 26m days lost to work related ill health in 2015–16, up from 23.3m in 2014–15 and 21.4m in 2010–11.

Rates of illness in the manufacturing sector also increased slightly last year, from 2560 per 100,000 workers to 2630, though in 2013–14 the rate was higher still.

The number of injuries in the manufacturing sector has remained broadly static at around 13,500 over the past two years. The rate of over seven day injury also declined slightly from 384 to 360, and specified injuries followed a similar trend: from 107 to 103.

Around 621,000 workers sustained a non-fatal injury at work in 2015–16 according to self-reports. Some 200,000 had injuries that led to an absence from work of over three days, of which 152,000 had absences of over seven days.

Injuries sustained while handling, lifting or carrying were the most common (20%), followed by slipping or tripping (19%) and being hit by a moving object (10%).

The sector with the largest increase in the rate of illness was education, which climbed from 3270 illness per 100,000 workers in 2014–15 to 4070 in 2015–16. The number of people working in the sector who said they were suffering from stress, depression or anxiety increased by nearly 50% to 76,000.

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Source: Chris Warburton Heathandsafetyatwork.com

 

 

Latest Health & Safety Statistics

Health and safety statistics for 2015/16 released

Health and safety statistics for 2015/16 released 

Using information from the Labour Force Survey, RIDDOR reporting, HSE cost model, death certificates and HSE enforcement data, the report pulls together key facts about illness and injuries.

Occupational health in numbers

In 2015/16:

Latest Health & Safety Statistics

  • 1.3 milion workers suffer from work-related illness
  • 0.5 million suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders
  • 0.5 million suffer from work-related stress, depression or anxiety
  • There have been 2,515 deaths from mesothelioma

The costs of occupational ill health on business is clear. In 2015/16 there were 30.4 million working days lost due to work-related illness and non-fatal workplace injuries.

In monetary terms this cost business £14.1 billion in 2014/15 – excluding the costs of long latency illnesses, like cancer, and new cases of work-related illness cost £9.3 billion in the same year.

Fatal and non-fatal injuries in numbers

In 2015/16:

  • 0.6 million non-fatal injuries to workers
  • 72,202 non-fatal injuries to employees reported by employers
  • 144 fatal injuries to workers

The annual costs of workplace injury in 2014/15 was £4.8 billion.

The trends behind the figures

Figures alone mean virtually nothing unless you look at them in the context of wider data and comparisons.

Latest Health & Safety Statistics
Latest Health & Safety Statistics

With regard to occupational health, the HSE statistics report shows that there has been a general downward trend in the number of self-reported, work-related ill health disorders – at least until 2011/12 and more recently this rate has been broadly flat.

Similarly, the rate of self-reported stress, depression and anxiety has remained broadly flat for more than a decade.

These statistics indicate that we have reached a plateau, and that new and different approaches need to be adopted when tackling occupational health.

There are projected to be around 2,500 deaths per year from mesothelioma for the rest of this decade before numbers start to decline.

There has been a downward trend in the rate of fatal injury in the long-term, although this seems to have also hit a plateau in recent years.

The majority of fatal injuries come from falls from height, with being struck by moving vehicles coming in a close second.

Comparisons

The UK has the least fatal injuries when compared to other large EU economies, including Germany, Poland, Italy, Spain and France.

However, the UK comes in second place when looking at the percentage of self-reported, work-related injuries and health problems resulting in sick leave.

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construction health and safety

Construction in focus

Two years ago the UK Government published a report on worker well-being in the construction sector, arguing how improvements in this area were not only a target in themselves but also conducive to economic growth. This win/win focus on promoting greater levels of health and safety within the sector, is supported by regulations which govern some of the key operational tasks carried out by construction workers.

These include laws around working at height, which are structured under the basis of avoid, prevent, arrest, requiring employers and self-employed contractors to assess the risks and then organise and plan the work so it is carried out safely.

Work at height is the biggest single cause of serious injury within the construction industry, with over 60 per cent of deaths resulting from falls on a site.

The starting point for planning is for employers to look at where they can avoid working at height. Where this is not possible, they must otherwise prevent or arrest a fall and the potential for serious injury, instructing and training their workforce in the precautions needed.

Method statements are widely used in the construction industry as part of this process. These are a useful way of recording the hazards involved in specific work at height tasks and communicating the risk and precautions required to all those involved in the work. The statement need be no longer than necessary to achieve these objectives effectively. It should also be clear and illustrated with simple sketches, where necessary, avoiding ambiguities or generalisations which could lead to confusion. Statements are for the benefit of those carrying out the work and their immediate supervisors and should not be overcomplicated. Equipment needed for safe working should be clearly identified and available before work starts with clear guidance on what should be done if the work method needs to be changed.

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As well as avoiding work at height operations where it practicable to do so, there are a number of additional precautions employers can put in place. Measures should be taken to prevent a worker from falling a distance which is liable to cause personal injury. This could include erecting a scaffold platform with double guard-rail and toe boards, for example. Installing equipment like safety nets to minimise the distance and consequences of a fall is also vital where work at height cannot be avoided or the fall prevented.

Manual handling is another key area covered by construction law governing the movement of items through lifting, lowering, carrying, pushing or pulling. While the weight of the item is an important issue, employers must also recognise the many other factors, including the number of times an items needs to be picked up or carried or the distance it is carried, as these can enhance the risk of musculoskeletal disorder injuries (MSDs).

MSDs are common construction-related injuries which include damage or disorder of the joints and other tissues in the upper/lower limbs or the back. Statistics from the Labour Force Survey indicate that MSDs, including those caused by manual handling, account for more than a third of all reported work-related illnesses.

The Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 require employers to manage these risks on behalf of their employees. This includes avoiding hazardous manual handling operations, moving loads through automated or mechanised processes wherever possible. If it can’t be avoided, a suitable and sufficient risk assessment from hazardous manual handling operations is required which sets out ways of reducing the potential of injury.

It is also important for employers to adopt an ergonomic approach to manual handling across their operations, taking into account the nature of the task, size of the load, the working environment and where and when direct worker participation is necessary.

The HSE has developed a number of supportive resources, including the MAC and the V-MAC tools which help employers analyse lifting, carrying and team handling. The ART tool gives advice and guidance on managing repetitive upper limb tasks, while the RAPP tool covers pushing and pulling requirements on a construction site. Often multiple tools will be required to complete a task. More information on these can be found at the HSE website.

These resources are there to support the wider legislative agenda of further protecting the people who work in the UK construction sector. It’s important for employers to be aware of these rules and use the tools that are available to promote a better working environment.

Source: SHP – Jerry Hill Safety, Head of Consultancy Support for NatWest Mentor, gives an overview of  some of the key topics in health and safety in construction.

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Importance of managing and implementing health & safety measures in construction

The issue of health, safety and environment (HSE) remains one of the top priorities in the local, regional and global construction industry.

Efficient health and safety at workplace not only ensures that employees are happy and productive, but can also help to reduce both the human and business costs of injuries and unnecessary lawsuits. By making health and safety the priority, construction companies are effectively communicating that competent employees are a valuable resource in the industry. Additionally, improved health and safety standards help companies become more effective to finish projects on time and improve their business profile with customers and clients. By introducing basic health and safety standards, organisations can understand the human capital benefits this has across the company.

Management must not only provide their workers with the right safety tools at work, but also equip and induct them with understanding on proper use and maintenance of these tools. Several organisations, for instance, focus on educating and explaining HSE rules and regulations to employees, contractors and vendors, as well as utilising industry experience to implement such standards.

HSE standards and technical specifications must first be discussed and implemented before any person steps onto any construction site, whether in an established building or a new site. Also, gaps between local and international HSE standards can be bridged through an approach that involves a method statement, risk assessment and job safety analysis.

  1. Method statement:

A method statement is a standard document widely used in the construction industry. It details specific instructions on how to perform a work-related task, including how to operate a piece of machinery or equipment.

This breakdown of tasks is essential in a workplace where a large part of the workforce is unskilled and lacks general knowledge in HSE standards. In addition, the method statement includes how this process should be completed for both employees and contractors throughout the duration of the project. A method statement features a step-by-step process on how to implement HSE standards, must be prepared for each task on a particular worksite and then included in the overall construction safety plan, ensuring that HSE standards have been taken into account for every section of the project. The document is a testament to the fact that workers are a priority, which in turn means they will remain happier and more productive.

Another vital component of the method statement is considering worker welfare and the long-term benefits that this has on raising the health and safety standards throughout the industry. Considering that many labourers come from countries where their worksite safety is not treated as a key concern, it is important to educate workers with the basics of HSE standards.

  1. Risk assessment:
Fatigue Management is one of many things Project Managers have to stay on top of
Fatigue Management is one of many things Project Managers have to stay on top of

Risk assessment determines the quantitative or qualitative value of risk on a particular worksite and any recognised hazards. Risk assessment is a core component of HSE standards and is also an opportunity to focus on what might cause serious harm to people, and determine whether an organisation or company is taking the necessary preventative measures to tackle it. During a risk assessment, there is a valuable opportunity to identify sensible measures to control in the workplace and to think about how accidents may happen and concentrate on the very real risks that are involved.

Most accidents are more likely due to the lack of workers’ knowledge of health and safety. However, the problem can be addressed through regular training programmes and safety talks.

Risk assessment can be broken down further into two parts: a hazard, anything that may cause harm; and the risk, the chance that an individual may be harmed by a hazard along with a suggestion as to how serious this harm could be. An organisation should concentrate on both of these components as HSE standards remain applicable to all aspects of the construction industry.

  1. Job safety analysis:

Job safety analysis focuses on identifying and controlling workplace hazards, and aims to prevent personal injury to any operative working there or that may be passing by. During this phase, the company determines which job/task needs to be analysed as a risk or hazard, followed by breaking this down into a step-by-step sequence. This ensures that nothing is missed, and health and safety remain integral parts of each and every job. It is important to follow it up by categorising potential hazards, with the final step being implementing measures to overcome these hazards. Once more, by focusing on identifying and controlling workplace hazards, workers’ welfare remains at the core importance of a construction organisation. This then leads to motivated workers who understand the implications of these hazards and how to avoid personal injury.  

The role of management:

snip_20161010124149 product infoWhile method statement, risk assessment and job safety analysis are critical parts of HSE standards, this must be coupled with the role of management and their workers’ welfare. All these factors combined will help successfully implement HSE standards for the long-term benefit of organisations and more importantly workers. Instilling the knowledge and understanding of HSE standards among unskilled labourers through proper induction and training should start by focusing on the basics. This includes giving an overview of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), which is a another vital component of onsite safety and refers to protective clothing, safety reflective vests, safety helmets, hard hats, goggles or other garments or equipment that are designed to protect the wearer’s body from injury.

This overview must be done in basic terms and include a demonstration; with simple, supporting images to reiterate their point; along with a construction manager who can communicate it in the best way. This gives the workers an opportunity to ask any additional questions and further familiarise themselves with HSE standards. By implementing these measures, workers become more proactive when it comes to health and safety and what it really means to them. Some safety issues under management’s role include proper signage on site, and warning the workers and other visitors about potentially dangerous parts on site.

Source: Construction News

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snip_20161010124456 about us

A14 represents a huge Joint Venture projects in the constrction sector

A14 Extension – Online Competency & Site Management Systems making this more than just a road

A14 represents a huge Joint Venture projects in the constrction sector
A14 represents a huge Joint Venture project that will entail complex management processes between its partners

The government has now committed up to £1.5 billion investment to improve the A14 between Cambridge and Huntingdon and Mosaic Management Systems is at the heart of this project with its integrated site management software. This vital road upgrade will eventually relieve congestion, unlock growth and help to connect communities.

The project includes a major new bypass to the south of Huntingdon, widening part of the existing A14 between Swavesey and Girton, widening part of the A14 Cambridge northern bypass, widening a section of the A1 between Brampton and Alconbury and demolition of the A14 viaduct at Huntingdon.

The Joint Venture consortium that was awarded the contract comprises of Costain, Skanska, Balfour Beatty, Carillion, Atkins and CH2M. The Integrated Delivery Team (IDT) represented by Highways England and the six major contractors wanted to use the services of a single online platform to manage its site access, working practises and employee training, whereby contractors were issued with site cards working in conjunction with Smart Phone Apps and PDA hand held devices.

The IDT have stated from the outset that their aims is to deliver an exemplar project across the board for its client. Following on from a rigorous tender process that was seeking an innovative solution for site management, the Mosaic suite of products was chosen. The system was favoured over other solutions because it provides the client with a flexible and unique online platform to record all contractor activity on site encompassing Induction Management, CMS/Skill Gap analysis, fatigue & risk management, access integration, assessment & training, and stock & asset control via issued smart cards.

Mosaic Management Systems Managing Director John Micciche commented by saying:

snip_20161010124456 about us“We are extremely pleased to win this tender on such a prestigious project, as it will showcase how our online system can provide an end to end solution, while delivering across a dynamic working environment for the life of the project.”

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